The Horizon By Your Side Team Offers Support When You Need It

We will be by your side. It can make all the difference to have someone in your corner: a dedicated team member who will support you throughout your treatment. The Horizon By Your Side team is committed to improving lives with services and support for you and your family.

Whether you need personal support, insurance and cost assistance, or helpful resources, the Horizon By Your Side team is here to help. Once enrolled, you’ll be paired with a Clinical Nurse Educator (CNE). Your CNE provides you with dedicated, one-on-one support. They work directly with you to answer non-medical, logistical questions and provide support once you have been prescribed ACTIMMUNE® (Interferon gamma-1b) and you have completed enrollment.

In addition, your Clinical Nurse Educator can help you:

  • Get non-medical educational support
  • Avoid surprises at the start of treatment by talking about what to expect
  • Discuss how your new treatment can fit into your routine and meet your goals
  • Understand cost assistance options
  • Learn about the insurance process
  • Coordinate delivery with the specialty pharmacy to schedule shipments of your medicine
  • Get injection training and support
  • Connect to a sharps disposal program for easy needle and syringe pickup and disposal
  • Receive refill reminders to help you stay on ACTIMMUNE® as your doctor has instructed
  • Connect with advocacy groups for more support and inform you of events in your area

Photo of Horizon Clinical Nurse EducatorPhoto of Horizon Clinical Nurse EducatorPhoto of Horizon Clinical Nurse Educator

Shannon, Clinical Nurse Educator

If you have non-medical questions about this program, call 1-877-305-7704 to connect with a Clinical Nurse Educator.

Hear How a Clinical Nurse Educator Can Help Families Feel Confident and Supported

Read transcript

My name is Irma. I'm the clinical nurse educator. When I go to the patient's house, the first thing I do is I introduce myself and my role and why I'm there for that day. I give them an opportunity to just share everything that they've been through.

I'm Jeannie, the mother of Thaddeus. My son is 9 years old, and he was diagnosed with CGD at 6 years old. The great thing about the support services is that it helps you not to feel alone. Just having that person that you know that you can call, and they can come and visit, and they can get to know your child and know you.

We offer education, support, and advocacy. They can pick up the phone and call us. We're there with them.

One of the most important things is when she described the CGD to Thaddeus to help him understand what was wrong with his system, what caused it. That it wasn't his fault.

I let them know that it's an inherited primary immunodeficiency disease. It affects the child's ability to fight infection. It doesn't mean that they have to be isolated from the world. It doesn't affect who they are. They just need to be careful.

I encourage any new families to take advantage of the support services, because the support team is fantastic.

Important Safety Information

What is ACTIMMUNE®  (Interferon gamma-1b) used for?

ACTIMMUNE® is part of a drug regimen used to treat Chronic Granulomatous Disease, or CGD. CGD is a genetic disorder, usually diagnosed in childhood, that affects some cells of the immune system and the body’s ability to fight infections effectively. CGD is often treated (though not cured) with antibiotics, antifungals, and ACTIMMUNE.

ACTIMMUNE is also used to slow the worsening of severe, malignant osteopetrosis (SMO). SMO is a genetic disorder that affects normal bone formation and is usually diagnosed in the first few months after birth.

When should I not take ACTIMMUNE?

Don’t use ACTIMMUNE if you are allergic to interferon-gamma,  E coli-derived products, or any ingredients contained in the product.

What warnings should I know about ACTIMMUNE?

At high doses, ACTIMMUNE can cause (flu-like) symptoms, which may worsen some pre-existing heart conditions.

ACTIMMUNE may cause decreased mental status, walking disturbances, and dizziness, particularly at very high doses. These symptoms are usually reversible within a few days upon dose reduction or discontinuation of therapy.

Bone marrow function may be suppressed with ACTIMMUNE, and decreased production of cells important to the body may occur. This effect, which can be severe, is usually reversible when the drug is discontinued or the dose is reduced.

Taking ACTIMMUNE may cause reversible changes to your liver function, particularly in patients less than 1 year old. Your doctor should monitor your liver function every 3 months, and monthly in children under 1 year.

In rare cases, ACTIMMUNE can cause severe allergic reactions and/or rash. If you experience a serious reaction to ACTIMMUNE, discontinue it immediately and contact your doctor or seek medical help.

What should I tell my healthcare provider?

Be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking.

Tell your doctor if you:

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant or plan to nurse
  • have a cardiac condition such as irregular heartbeat, heart failure, or decreased blood flow to your heart
  • have a history of seizures or other neurologic disorders
  • have, or have had, reduced bone marrow function. Your doctor will monitor these cells with blood tests at the beginning of therapy and at 3-month intervals on ACTIMMUNE therapy

What are the side effects of ACTIMMUNE?

The most common side effects with ACTIMMUNE are “flu-like” symptoms such as fever, headache, chills, muscle pain, or fatigue, which may decrease in severity as treatment continues. Bedtime administration of ACTIMMUNE may help reduce some of these symptoms. Acetaminophen may be helpful in preventing fever and headache.

What other medications might interact with ACTIMMUNE?

Some drugs may interact with ACTIMMUNE to potentially increase the risk of damage to your heart or nervous system, such as certain chemotherapy drugs. Tell your doctor about all other medications you are taking.

Avoid taking ACTIMMUNE at the same time as a vaccination.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call  1-800-FDA-1088.

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more, talk about ACTIMMUNE with your healthcare provider or pharmacist. The FDA-approved product labeling can be found at http://www.ACTIMMUNE.com or 1-866-479-6742.

Important Safety Information

What is ACTIMMUNE®  (Interferon gamma-1b) used for?

ACTIMMUNE® is part of a drug regimen used to treat Chronic Granulomatous Disease, or CGD. CGD is a genetic disorder, usually diagnosed in childhood, that affects some cells of the immune system and the body’s ability to fight infections effectively. CGD is often treated (though not cured) with antibiotics, antifungals, and ACTIMMUNE.

ACTIMMUNE is also used to slow the worsening of severe, malignant osteopetrosis (SMO). SMO is a genetic disorder that affects normal bone formation and is usually diagnosed in the first few months after birth.

When should I not take ACTIMMUNE?

Don’t use ACTIMMUNE if you are allergic to interferon-gamma,  E coli-derived products, or any ingredients contained in the product.

What warnings should I know about ACTIMMUNE?

At high doses, ACTIMMUNE can cause (flu-like) symptoms, which may worsen some pre-existing heart conditions.

ACTIMMUNE may cause decreased mental status, walking disturbances, and dizziness, particularly at very high doses. These symptoms are usually reversible within a few days upon dose reduction or discontinuation of therapy.

Bone marrow function may be suppressed with ACTIMMUNE, and decreased production of cells important to the body may occur. This effect, which can be severe, is usually reversible when the drug is discontinued or the dose is reduced.

Taking ACTIMMUNE may cause reversible changes to your liver function, particularly in patients less than 1 year old. Your doctor should monitor your liver function every 3 months, and monthly in children under 1 year.

In rare cases, ACTIMMUNE can cause severe allergic reactions and/or rash. If you experience a serious reaction to ACTIMMUNE, discontinue it immediately and contact your doctor or seek medical help.

What should I tell my healthcare provider?

Be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking.

Tell your doctor if you:

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant or plan to nurse
  • have a cardiac condition such as irregular heartbeat, heart failure, or decreased blood flow to your heart
  • have a history of seizures or other neurologic disorders
  • have, or have had, reduced bone marrow function. Your doctor will monitor these cells with blood tests at the beginning of therapy and at 3-month intervals on ACTIMMUNE therapy

What are the side effects of ACTIMMUNE?

The most common side effects with ACTIMMUNE are “flu-like” symptoms such as fever, headache, chills, muscle pain, or fatigue, which may decrease in severity as treatment continues. Bedtime administration of ACTIMMUNE may help reduce some of these symptoms. Acetaminophen may be helpful in preventing fever and headache.

What other medications might interact with ACTIMMUNE?

Some drugs may interact with ACTIMMUNE to potentially increase the risk of damage to your heart or nervous system, such as certain chemotherapy drugs. Tell your doctor about all other medications you are taking.

Avoid taking ACTIMMUNE at the same time as a vaccination.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call  1-800-FDA-1088.

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more, talk about ACTIMMUNE with your healthcare provider or pharmacist. The FDA-approved product labeling can be found at http://www.ACTIMMUNE.com or 1-866-479-6742.